Oral contraceptives may increase risk of depression

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In a survey of more than 1,200 women, researchers found that women who used the birth control pill in their teens were up to three times more likely to suffer from clinical depression than women who had never before used.

The postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia and lead author of the study, Christine Anderl, believes that these results demonstrate how much remains to be learned about the long-term effects of hormonal contraception.

<q data-attributes = "{" lang ": {" value ":" fr "," label ":" French "}," value ": {" html ":" It's very important that women have access safe and effective at birth planning, which is a universal right, she says. The only problem is that we still do not know the potential side effects."," text ":" It is very important that women have safe and effective access to family planning, which is a universal right, "she says. The only problem is that we still do not know the potential side effects. "}}" Lang = "en">It is very important that women have safe and effective access to family planning, which is a universal right, she says. The only problem is that we still do not know the potential side effects.

She notes that women are twice as likely as men to experience depression at some point in their lives.

More research needed

A teenager in bed.

The researchers are currently recruiting girls aged 13 to 15 for a study that would measure their hormone levels and assess their emotional well-being over a three-year period.

Photo: iStock

According to the study published Wednesday in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, the correlation between use of the birth control pill and depression was constant even after the researchers controlled for other factors such as age at first intercourse and first menstruation, and age at first intercourse. socioeconomic status, smoking history and previous pregnancies.

However, the data they used did not show whether there was an increased risk for women who had been using oral contraceptives for longer.

According to Anderl, further research is needed to determine whether the use of the birth control pill in adolescence actually causes depression.

His team is currently looking for girls aged 13 to 15 for a study that would measure their hormone levels and assess their emotional well-being over a three-year period.

The relationship seems to be presentsaid Mrs. Anderl. She hopes, however, that further research will lead to a real correlation. Christine Anderl believes that establishing a direct link could change the way doctors talk about family planning with their patients, especially if they have a family history of depression.

With information from Eva Uguen-Csenge, CBC News



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https://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1279418/avortement-pilules-anticonceptionnelle-femme-grossesse

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